hardware

Why git is good for hardware development.

Why Git is good for hardware development

Git has become an essential tool in modern software development workflows, providing a robust and flexible foundation for version control and collaboration. But, it’s not limited to just code. It is also used for versioning and tracking changes in various types of files and projects, including hardware development.

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Full PCB redline shows an automatically removed test point.

Reviewing component changes and chip shortages

Over the last 6 months, the global semiconductor shortage has been consistently making news for the wave of resulting disruption across the hardware world. From automotive to consumer electronics, virtually every hardware industry has had to scramble to find component replacements ranging from sophisticated ICs to simple microcontrollers.

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Adopting a SW like HW development process.

8 benefits of adopting software processes for hardware

Because software and hardware are so closely connected, they are starting to cross-pollinate across teams. Hardware engineers are cherry picking what can improve their current processes. Although these principles cannot be simply copied and pasted from SW to HW development, much can be borrowed and adapted. We broke down how to do so in 8 ways.

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AllSpice screenshot of design review comment.

Top 5 questions team leads ask about using Git for hardware

In the world of software development, Git has etched its name as the go-to version control system. Git’s advantages to productivity and focus on continuous improvement have helped spawn entire industries. But what about its application in the realm of hardware?

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Google trends graph of git versus svn search frequency.

7 reasons why hardware teams are adopting Git

Git was created as a result of controversy. Before its launch in 2005, the Linux kernel’s continued development was revoked of its free, open-source status. A proprietary DVCS called Bitkeeper set out to control the market. By being too little too late, the end result was the rapid growth of Git in software that continues today.

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